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KANSAS ASSOCIATION of HISTORIANS

Formerly KHTA

Independence Kansas

KAH Annual Meeting

Independence Community College
Independence, Kansas
April 11 & 12, 2008

Register Now!

The 82nd Annual meeting of the Kansas Association of Historians will be held on the campus of Independence Community College on April 11 and 12.

Panels will be held in the Fireside Room (Student Union), the AC200 Lecture Hall (Academic Building) or in the Board Room (Administrative Building).  Registration and exhibits will be in the foyer of the William Inge Theater.

FRIDAY, APRIL 11

  • 11:00 – 4:00          Registration, Foyer of the William Inge Theatre
  • 1:30 – 2:55            Panels (Session I)
  • 3:00 – 4:30            Panels (Session II)
  • 5:30                       Dinner at the Independence Museum

On Friday two Tours of Historic Independence will be conducted by van at 11:00 AM to 12:00 noon and 3:00 to 4:00 PM.  Admission is free and transportation will be provided by the College.  Approximately 12 can be accommodated on each tour, so sign up early if you wish to go!  We request that local residents allow our visitors an opportunity to see the community (you folks can always take advantage of the annual Inge Festival & Neewollah tours).

 

SATURDAY, APRIL 12

  • 8:00 – 9:45            Panels (Session III)
  • 10:00 – 11:45        Panels (Session IV)
  • 11:45 – 12:15        Annual Business Meeting, Board Room, Administrative Building
  • 12:30                     Lunch,  Fireside Room, Student Union,

                              Luncheon Speaker: Dr. David A. Nichols

KAH 2008 ANNUAL CONFERENCE
Luncheon Speaker

Dr. David A. Nichols is the author of A Matter of Justice: Eisenhower and the beginning of the Civil Rights Revolution (New York: Simon & Schuster, 2007).
  
“A provocative narrative history that completely inverts our long-held understanding of Eisenhower and civil rights…  Nichols replaces the disinterested, mildly racist president that historians have traditionally embraced with an Eisenhower who was fully engaged in the legal fight for civil rights for African Americans in the 1950s.”
                                                                       Press Release- Deirdre Mueller, Simon & Schuster
                       

David A. Nichols is the leading authority on Eisenhower and civil rights. A former professor and academic dean at Southwestern College in Kansas, he is also the author of Lincoln and the Indians: Civil War Policy and Politics. He lives in Winfield, Kansas.

KAH 2008 Program (tentative)

Session I:  Friday, April 11 @ 1:30 PM
History and Literature:  The Ties That Bind
            Justin Q. Olmstead, Winfield High School and Southwestern College:  TBA
            Loron Hays, Winfield High School and Southwestern College:  TBA
            Brad Wall, Winfield High School:  TBA
        Innovation and Experimentation in Kansas
Norman Saul, University of Kansas:  The Progressive Communist Community:  the Russian Kansas Socialist Experiment Reappraised
Brandon K. Wentz, Washburn University:  Throwing a Curve:  Hap Dumont and his National Baseball Congress
Isaias J. McCaffery, Independence Community College:  Rewards of Insolvency:  The Positive Economic Impact of Southeast Kansas’s Union Traction Company, 1907-1947
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Session II:  Friday, April 11 @ 3:00 PM
Fundamentalists on Every Page:  Newspapers Discover Twentieth-Century Evangelicals and Fundamentalists
Alan Bearman, Washburn University:  “Film Stars—So Why Not Billy?”:  The London Press and Billy Graham in 1954
Jennifer L. Mills, Washburn University:  Mencken and Monkeys:  Fundamentalists in the National Press during the 1920s
ReAnne Utemark, Washburn University:  Reading it for the Articles:  The Impact of Hustler v. Falwell on the Reverend Jerry Falwell, the Moral Majority and the Religious Right

 

Finding a Voice:  Protest and Mutiny
Vaughan Scribner, Kansas State University:  “We had Borne as Long as Human Nature Could Endure”:  Continental Soldiers’ Experiences of Suffering in the American Revolutionary War
Jess Rezac, Washburn University:  Saying No to Thunder:  The Deterioration of Women’s Status in Igboland
        Jilian Hocking, Kansas State University:  Spilt Milk:  Waste Not, Want Not

Session III:  Saturday, April 12 @ 8:00 AM

Working in Kansas:  Oral History in the Classroom
            Dr. John Mack and Students, Labette Community College:  TBA
     Religion, Politics and Popular Culture
Kip A. Wedel, Kansas State University:  Civil Religion and the Radio Western, 1933-1960
Amy Billinger, Washburn University, An Irony of Nuclear Proportions:  The Impact of Religion on the Development of the Atomic Bomb
Jonathan Root, Kansas State University:  The Battle for America:  The Civil Religion of the Secretary of the Interior James G. Watt, 1981-1983
Immigration, Instigation, and Comparison
            Spencer Davis, Peru State College:  Lincoln and Tocqueville
Kathryn K. Marshall, Washburn University:  The Tonkin Gulf Incident:  Truth, Lies, and “Freak Weather Effects”
Tim Rives, National Archives and Records Administration, Central Plains Region:  The 1920s Klan and Contemporary Minutemen:  A Comparison


Session IV:  Saturday, April 12 @ 10:00 AM

Reflections on the Grand Tour
Bethany R. Mowry, Washburn University:  Goats, Goddesses and Genitalia:  The Secret Cabinet of Naples as Seen by the Grand Tourist
Whitney Philippi, Washburn University:  From Whores of Babylon to Pious Princes:  The Transformational Experience of Thomas Gray on the Grand Tour
Sara Heckman, Washburn University:  Angelica Kauffmann:  The Muse of Neoclassical History Painting in Eighteenth Century England
Thomas Prasch, Washburn University:  “My Country-women Would Rather Hear…”:  Hester Lynch Piozzi’s Regendering of the Grand Tour

Opportunities and Resources in History
Sharon Stephenson, Hutchinson Community College:  The National Endowment for the Humanities Landmarks Workshop
Michael A. Church, Kansas Historical Society:  Kansas Memory:  A Digital Archive from the Kansas Historical Society

Child and Community Welfare in Kansas
L. Candy Ruff, University of Kansas:  Politics Not Need:  Kansas Responds to Its Orphans
Rebecca Feil, Kansas State University:  The Ladies Aid Society and Home Demonstration Units as a Force for Change:  Broughton, Kansas, 1915-1930
         Diana J. Ringquist, University of Kansas:  Orphan Trains of Kansas:  1867-1930


Lodging Options for Independence, Kansas

The Appletree Inn, 201 N. 8th Street (downtown)
(620)-331-5500
Singles $77.95, Doubles $86.95, Triples $89.95 plus tax
Located downtown within easy walking distance of shops, the museum & eating establishments; indoor pool & exercise facilities.  Say you are with KAH.

Microtel Inn & Suites, 2917 W. Main St.
(620)-331-0088
Singles $54.95, Doubles $61.85 plus tax
On the western edge of town near Wal*Mart; a fairly new establishment.  Say you are with KAH.

Super-8 Motel, 2800 W. Main St.
(620)- 331-8288
Single $50.69, Doubles $60.69 plus tax
Also west of downtown; standard basic accommodations.  Say you are with KAH.

Townsman Motel, 1112 E. Main St.
(620)-331-5400
Singles $38.00, Doubles $45.00 plus tax
This is the stuff of local legend.  The faded romantic aura of “route 66-era” travel still lingers in a moody film-noir twilight.  You won’t need to mention KAH, and showing a valid I.D. may be optional. Venture into a gritty underworld beyond the dull manicured landscapes of elitist-snob campus existence.  Polish the old Chevy’s chrome and tail-fins, but park it under the lights, lock the doors and validate your insurance policy.  If traveling with a spouse, be ready for the dog-house—but once you’re on speaking terms again, what a story to share with friends back home!

As an alternative, one might consider staying in Coffeyville, KS.  Fifteen miles to the south (take 10th St. and follow the signs), there are several motel options to “google.”

ICC is located 2 miles south of town.  Take Main St. to 10th and drive south about two miles.  Pass the convenience store on your left and turn 1 block later on Road 58.  On the corner is a brick building with the letters “RSI.”  Less than ¼ of a mile later you’ll see the campus.  Registration is in the foyer of the William Inge Theatre. 

 

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